“But, Mom, What About the Dog?”: A Personal Tale of Work+Life Fit Imperfection

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For those of you who follow the weekly Tweak It Practice, you know that step #1 every seven days is to sit down and celebrate what you DID get done the previous week.

That means if you scheduled 10 “tweaks” or small, meaningful actions into your work+life fit and only accomplished 5, give yourself credit for the 50% you did do.  Celebrate success!

Perfection isn’t the goal; however, in the moment, that can be hard to remember…even for me.

For the past few years, we’ve been very lucky.  My husband’s job didn’t require a great deal of travel.  When I was out of town, I could rely on him to be with the kids in the evening.

But he recently changed jobs and for the first time I was scheduled to speak at a conference when he wasn’t going to be home.

My babysitter offered to stay overnight; however, because it’s the summer, both of my kids were invited to sleep over at a friend’s house.

The week before the speech, I meticulously scheduled all of the logistical planning “tweaks” into my work+life fit so that everything would be set while I was out of town.  Or so I thought.

A couple of hours after my speech, as I sat in my hotel room feeling pretty good about how I’d coordinated all of the pieces of our new work and life puzzle, my daughter calls to ask, “Mom, I’m getting ready to go over to Kate’s house, but what about the dog?”

The dog. Oh goodness, I’d forgotten to figure out who would feed and walk the dog if no one was going to be home overnight! Ugh!

Expected at a cocktail reception and dinner hosted by my client in 30 minutes, I now had to find a dog sitter!

Over the next 20 minutes, I frantically texted and called neighbors to see who had a key and who would be available to take care of Honey (pictured above in all her glory!).

Finally, I found someone and made it to the client event, but I had to laugh.  At the exact moment I’d started to give myself credit for 100% work+life fit perfection, the universe quickly reminded me, “perfection is not the goal.”

Something always comes up, but instead of beating myself up for forgetting about the dog and thinking, “Ah, I can’t do this,” I sat back and took a moment to celebrate success.  I gave myself credit for everything else that did go well.

Can you relate?  When have you forgotten to plan a key logistical “tweak” into your work+life fit and dropped a ball?  How did you respond?  Did you focus on what you did or did not accomplish?

I’d love to hear.  Share your story in the comments section below, on Twitter cc. @caliyost, or on our Facebook page.

 

“Want to Work Less?” All Hands Go Up. “But, You’ll Make Less Money” Most Hands Go Down

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Suddenly, it seems everywhere you look another billionaire is promoting a reduced workweek.  I recently appeared on WSJ Live to share my thoughts on the trend (scroll down to view the clip–I make my main points at 3:35).

While I believe their motivations are valid, these moguls need to understand that it will not be easy to make their vision a reality.  Some major hurdles stand in their way.

First, who is saying what?

Latin American telecom tycoon, Carlos Slim, is extolling the virtues of the three-day workweek, while the founders of Google are discussing the benefits of splitting one full-time job into many part-time jobs.

Why?  They have identified real challenges that could, in theory, be addressed through the collective reduction in the amount of time we work each week.

For Slim, the challenge is how to help people stay healthy so they can extend the number of years they are able to remain in the paid workforce.

For the founders of Google, the challenge is how to address the potential mass-displacement of workers by technology (e.g driverless cars, etc.), a not-so-distant reality recently described in an oped by respected Silicon Valley insider, Vivek Wadhwa.

Sounds good…but not that simple

Translating what may sound good on paper into action is not going to be easy for the following reasons:

People can’t afford to make less money.  If you ask a room full of people if they’d like to work fewer hours a week, almost every hand will go up.  However, if you add, “…but you will make less money” most hands will go down.

Bottom line: most people can’t afford to work less.  Therefore, any discussion of a reduced workweek must address financial reality, especially since individuals are being asked to shoulder more of the expense and risk of retirement and health care.

Workplace legislation and management infrastructure are based on a 35-to-40 hour workweek.  Any change in the standard workweek would require major legislative, HR policy and accounting regulation updates and overhauls.

For example, today overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act is calculated based on a 40 hour workweek. Would that change or stay the same?

In most organizations, compensation and benefits, such as health care, retirement contributions, and vacation are calculated based on a 35 or 40-hour full-time workweek.

In terms of accounting, internal head count cost allocations in most organizations are also based upon a full-time, 40-hour workweek.  That means if an employee works part-time the system still charges the business unit overhead for a full-time worker. It’s not prorated. If you hire another part-time worker, that’s another full head count.

How do you deploy more people working fewer days/hours and remain responsive and competitive in a global economy?  This won’t be as big an issue for less human capital intensive, or highly localized industries, but for service industries with customers in many time zones, a reduced workweek will require more complex coordination and communication across people, teams and shifts.  Managers will have to break their addiction to management by face-time.

Carlos Slim and the founders of Google have identified very real challenges.  They should be applauded for starting an important conversation.  But any wholesale reduction or reconfiguration of the workweek will require new approaches to compensation, updated employment legislation, and revised team management processes, benefits calculations and internal cost accounting rules to succeed.  That will be a heavy lift.

What do you think about the growing interest in reducing the workweek on a broader scale?  Does it have merit?  Could it really work?

What Happened When Silicon Valley Tackled Family Caregiving

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“The vast majority of health care is actually provided by families, not by health care professionals.”Catalyzing Technology to Support Family Caregiving

Last year, I presented at a conference where the luncheon keynote speaker was the CEO of a non-profit hospital chain.

As we ate, the CEO excitedly shared how her organization was radically rethinking the delivery of medical care at all levels, including post-treatment convalescence.

She explained how more and more of their patients are convalescing at home, which means the patient is discharged as soon as possible after a surgical procedure. They recuperate at home under the care of family and friends with the support of periodic nursing visits, and remote monitoring.

She continued “we have found patients prefer this arrangement, and it has allowed us to dramatically reduce costs while continuing to provide high quality care. We, and other hospitals systems, see this as the model for the future.”

At that moment, all I could think was, “Hold the phone. Who exactly are these family members and friends who are now expected to oversee the recuperation and convalescence of their loved ones at home from often major surgical procedures? Does this CEO understand that most of these people work?”

So I raised my hand and asked the question.  Not surprisingly, the CEO didn’t have an answer because that’s not her primary concern. The challenge this CEO is solving for is how to deliver the highest quality care to the most people in the most efficient and cost-effective way. On that dimension, she and other healthcare leaders are succeeding.

How can technology help us to deliver care on top of everything else we have to do, on and off the job?

This means that more and more of the burden to deliver all but the most acute level of care will fall to loved ones–family members and friends, most of whom will have to provide that often medically complicated care while continuing to hold down and perform at their paid job (70% of caregivers to be exact–Pew).

How is that sustainable?

With this question in mind, I jumped at an invitation from the National Alliance for Caregiving to participate in a unique day-long roundtable with twenty-two other experts from government, Silicon Valley, caregiving advocacy organizations, and researcher institutions this past April.

This diverse, committed group spent hours at the Institute for the Future offices in Palo Alto tackling these questions:

“Until now, technology has made only modest contributions to supporting caregivers.  Can technology play a more meaningful role in helping caregivers? And how can we accelerate innovation in developing new applications to support caregivers?”

The thought-provoking result of our collective effort can be found in the just-released report,  ”Catalyzing Technology to Support Family Caregiving“ (and press release) and is synopsized in this model:

Specific recommendations include:

  • Create better “concept maps” and find more appropriate language to describe the varied and complex caregiving landscape. The way we currently talk about and think about caregiving is too simplistic. For innovation to occur, we need more accurate, complex models and maps of what caregiving actually entails.
  • Continue to collect extensive data about the prevalence, burden and impact of caregiving. Again, for technology to support the caregiver, we need more and better data showing the diversity of caregivers and growing complexity of caregiving responsibilities.
  • Spur a broad national conversation on caregiving.  Quite simply–we need to talk about the growing challenge of the working family caregiver much more than we do. As we learned from our Silicon Valley colleagues, entrepreneurs won’t invest if there isn’t widespread attention on the topic because they don’t see the market, even though the market is huge.
  • Develop a compelling business case for employers and healthcare providers to support caregiving.  In other words, help the leaders like the hospital CEO, and those that employ the increasingly overburdened family caregiver to understand the business case for offering smarter and better supports.
  • Inspire social conversations about caregiving to encourage more learning and support within families and communities. Basically, we aren’t talking to and supporting each other when we find ourselves knee deep in family caregiving responsibilities. How can we leverage and scale existing in person and virtual caregiver support models like CareGiving.com?

And last, but not least, the recommendation I am particularly passionate about because of the work I do with employees and employers…

  • Provide caregiving coaching as an integral component of all solutions. My main contribution to the dialogue was to point out that any technology solution developed to help the family caregiver has to be simple and usable. Also working caregivers need help learning how to fit that technology into all of the other, often chaotic, responsibilities they are frantically trying to manage, on and off the job.

How to make an “Intelligent Family Care Assistant” part of your work+life fit?

For example, one of the technology solutions the group proposed was called an “Intelligent Family Care Assistant,” a system to keep track of and coordinate the family’s care tasks.

The challenge, of course, remains what type of coaching does a family caregiver need to learn how to integrate that technology into their already busy work+life fit? And who would provide that coaching (e.g. hospitals, employers, doctors), and how (e.g. live, in-person, virtually)?

An exercise that the roundtable group completed gave me hope that we are close to knowing what that coaching model looks like and how to deliver it.

In this joint exercise, the group spent about 20 minutes identifying all of the activities and priorities a family caregiver has to deal with only once, then yearly, monthly, weekly, daily, nightly, etc.  We wrote each priority and activity on a post-it note.

On pages 16-18 of the report, you will see pictures of post-it notes we then put into columns labeled labeled Medical, Wellness, Movement, Home, Social, Finance, Legal, Emotional and Personal Care, by level of frequency.

Essentially what the group did together in 20 minutes was complete a more complex version of the Tweak It Practice, with each post-it representing not only a “tweak” but also the inputs a caregiver would put into a care app like Unfrazzle. In other words, “contextualizing” coaching and support models like Tweak It and Unfrazzle exist, now it’s a matter of continuing to innovate and scale.

What do you think it will take encourage the innovation required to support the growing ranks of family caregivers (one of which will likely be us someday)?

Also, I invite you to connect with me and share your thoughts on Twitter @caliyost and Facebook.

FREE Webinar 5/21 at 2 pm EST–Intentional Flexibility: 5 Steps to Move Beyond Ambivalence

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“Ambivalence” is defined as the coexistence of positive and negative feelings toward the same object or action simultaneously drawing you in opposite directions.

According to our new research, full-time U.S. workers see ambivalence when asked about employer commitment to work life flexibility  – 46% say their employer’s commitment is strong, while the other 45% aren’t so sure the commitment is there.

On the surface, this uncertainty seems to contradict reality when you consider that 97% of full-time employees said they had some form of work life flexibility in 2013 (with 23% reporting an increase from the prior year), and almost one-third of respondents indicated they did most of their work from a remote location other than their employer’s site.

But the ambivalence is happening, and it keeps organizations and individuals from realizing the full benefit of a more strategic, intentional approach to flexibility in how, when and where work is done.

Join me LIVE on Wednesday, May 21st at 2:00 pm EST for a 45-minute webinar where I will discuss:

  • Highlights of our new research, “Employees Sense Weakened Commitment to Work Life Flexibility.
  • Why employers may be ambivalent toward work life flexibility, even though most of their employees report having at least some form of it, and
  • The five steps employers and individuals can take to move beyond unproductive ambivalence and confidently embrace the benefits of strategic, intentional flexibility.

Click HERE to register.  See you on the 21st and bring your questions!

Check out the infographic of research highlights we will discuss:

 

 

Employees Sense Weakened Commitment to Work Life Flexibility (INFOGRAPHIC)

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The infographic, below, summaries key findings from our most recent national research report,“Ambivalence is Not a Strategy: Employees Sense Waning Commitment to Flexibility.”

Findings are based on a national probability telephone survey of 556 full-time employed adults conducted by ORC International during December, 2013.  The survey has a margin of error of +/- 4%.

Work life flexibility is defined as “having flexibility in when, where and how you work.  It allows you to flexibly allocate time and energy between your work life and personal life.”

Click HERE for link to infographic PDF:

NEW Research Finds Employees Sense Weakened Commitment to Work Life Flexibility / Lack of Training Contributes to Eroding Confidence

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Things have been a little bit quiet on the blog for the last couple of months due to the overwhelming response to the first report we released from our study of full-time U.S. workers conducted with ORC International.

Today, we release the second report from the study.  We hope it generates an equally robust debate.   Be sure to scroll down and sign up for next week’s webinar “Intentional Flexibility,” because ambivalence is not a strategy!

 

 

New Research Finds Employees Sense Weakened Commitment to Work Life Flexibility 

Lack of Training Contributes to Eroding Confidence

More than 4 in 10 full-time employees surveyed reported their employer’s commitment to work life flexibility may have waned in the past year, despite the overwhelming availability of workplace flexibility, according to a new research report from the Flex+Strategy Group/Work+Life Fit, Inc. (FSG/WLF).

The findings are based upon a national probability telephone survey of 556 full-time employed adults conducted by ORC International with a margin of error of +/- 4 percent. The FSG/WLF research, part of a biennial study first conducted in 2006, also found:

  • Almost all full-time employees (97%) reported having some form of work life flexibility in 2013.
  • But, a majority (57%) of employees did not receive training or guidance on how to manage work life flexibility.
  • A majority of employees (62%) continue to cite obstacles to work life flexibility with the number of employees noting their workloads increased/they had no time rising from 29% in 2011 to 37% in 2013. Women (44%) citied this as an obstacle significantly more than men (33%).
  • A higher percentage of respondents (85% in 2013 compared to 66% in 2011) believe employee loyalty, health and performance suffer in workplaces without work life flexibility.

“It’s not just Yahoo, Best Buy and Bank of America that have sent mixed signals on flexibility in the past year or so,” said Flex+Strategy Group CEO Cali Williams Yost, a flexible workplace strategist and author. “Despite the fact that almost all full-time employees had some type of work life flexibility in the last year employees see and sense employer ambivalence toward work life flexibility.

“Ambivalence, however, is not a strategy,” Yost warned. “Organizations need to be intentional and deliberate about what type of flexibility works for their business.”

The latest FSG/WLF research found respondents were equally split between the 46% who described their employer’s commitment to work life flexibility as strong and the 45% who described it as uncertain. Among those who described the commitment as possibly weakening, 20% said it was evident their company reduced flexibility, 5% said they heard rumors or noticed signs of a decreased commitment and 20% said their employers are committed for now, but that could change. Further, 8% responded they didn’t know.

One reason for this eroding employee confidence is that nearly 60% of respondents said they did not receive any guidance or training to help manage their work life flexibility compared to only 40% who did receive such guidance/training. Those who did not were more likely to say it was evident their employer reduced work life flexibility while conversely those who did receive guidance/training were more likely to say their employer had a strong commitment.

We can’t expect employees to effectively manage and leverage work life flexibility when most receive no guidance or training. It’s not enough to just offer the option or provide a laptop,” explains Yost. “A strategy to maximize workplace flexibility should be as important to a business as a strategy to develop new products or identify new markets.”

More than ever, the need for such guidance is critical as a higher number of respondents in 2013 – more than 8 in 10 – cited negative impacts of workplaces without work life flexibility. A majority agreed employee loyalty (68%), health (64%) and performance (64%) suffer.

The way we live and work is changing and how well we each manage that change can affect health, wellbeing and business performance. Work life flexibility, or fit, is not only key to employee health and wellness, but also an important factor in sustainable business success,” Yost explains. “With a better understanding of this new reality, employers can empower their people to take personal accountability and action and develop informed strategies that suit the unique needs of their business and their workforce.”

Yost advises organizations to analyze how, when and where employees are working and then develop a strategic approach to work life flexibility tailored to those findings. This includes providing guidance and training that helps employees do their best both on and off the job while helping the business improve productivity, reduce costs and increase employee morale and engagement.

Yost will discuss her latest research in more detail and describe the critical elements of Intentional Flexibility in a 45-minute webinar Wednesday, May 21 at 2 p.m. EST. Register HERE.

Links to the summary report of findings and the infographic are below and can be found, along with previous FSG/WLF research, at www.worklifefit.com/research:

 

Telework Week Myth Busters in Pictures (Infographic)

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Download or print infographic, HERE.

View complete survey report upon which the infographic is based, “It’s 10 a.m. Do You Know Where and How Your Employees are Working?

Listen to WSJ MarketWatch Radio interview, “The average telecommuter isn’t who you think it is,” where FSG/WLF CEO, Cali Yost, talks about the research.

NEW RESEARCH: Reveals Major Telework Myths and Growing Open Office Struggle

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As we approach Telework Week 2014 (March 3-7), new national research from the Flex+Strategy Group / Work+Life Fit, Inc. shatters common myths about who is working where and reveals new realities along with new struggles about how full-time employees get their work done.

Key findings from the research, which looks both at telework and the growing open office trend, are outlined in the press release below.

More Women Put in Hours at the Office and in Cubes While More Men Telework

Men outpace women by a wide margin when it comes to telework – doing work from home, business center or another location – while women are more likely putting their hours in at their employer’s office according to new research that dispels long-standing telework myths and explores the increasing struggles of the open office trend.

The Flex+Strategy Group/Work+Life Fit, Inc. (FSG/WLF) found that among a national probability survey of 556 full-time employed adults nearly one-third (31%) do most of their work away from their employer’s location, and nearly three out of four of those remote workers are men.

“Failure to understand how and where work gets done and by whom, and failure to support these operational strategies with the attention and resources warranted – including training and guidance — can compromise the optimal performance and wellbeing of both organizations and employees,” explains flexible workplace strategist and author Cali Williams Yost, CEO, Flex+Strategy Group.

Telework Stereotypes Don’t Match Reality

FSG/WLF’s research dispelled several telework stereotypes. The typical full-time remote worker is:

  • NOT a woman: Among those that telework, 71 percent were men.
  • NOT a parent: There is no significant difference between remote workers with or without kids.
  • NOT a millennial: There is no significant difference in the age groups of remote workers.

“Almost one-third of the work that gets done today gets done from home, coffee shops and other locations, yet too many corporate leaders treat telework as a disposable option, as in the case of Yahoo,” Yost explains. “Telework is not a perk and it’s certainly not just for moms and Gen Y. Rather, it’s an operational strategy. Think of it as anything less and organizations ignore what has become a vital part of their business and the way their people actually work.”

Open Office Spaces Take Toll on Work Life Flexibility

Back at the employer site, respondents reported doing most of their work either in a private office (30%) or a cube or open office space (33%) with women (43%) significantly more likely than men (27%) to work in cubes/open spaces. Overall, cube/open office workers struggle the most.

  • They were the largest group reporting less work life flexibility now than at this time last year (42%) when compared to their remote and private office colleagues, and of those who feel they have the least control over their work life flexibility, cube/open office workers were the largest percentage.
  • They were significantly more likely to say they didn’t use or improve their work life flexibility because “it might hurt your career/others think you don’t work as hard” when compared to remote workers. Yost believes worries about a “mommy track” stigma may be one reason why fewer women work remotely.
  • They received the least amount of training to help them manage their work life flexibility. Remote workers (47%) were significantly more likely to receive such guidance compared to those in cubes/open spaces (35%).

“As organizations continue to squeeze more people into less square footage, they will be increasingly confronted with the limitations of open office plans and forced to accept that work life flexibility is a solution to where, when and how employees can get their work done with greater focus and performance,” Yost says. “Whether they work remotely or together on site, we need to help employees develop the critical skill set needed to manage their work life fit so they can successfully capture the best of collaborative and remote work environments.”

More about the survey:

FSG/WLF’s latest biennial research was made possible with support from Quest Diagnostics, the world’s leading provider of diagnostic information services, a premier provider of lab-based employer wellness services, and an award-winning healthy employer of more than 40,000 people.

Findings and analysis are solely FSG/WLF’s and are based upon a survey conducted by ORC International with a margin of error of +/- 4 percent.

LIVE WEBINAR: Cali Yost and experts from Quest Diagnostics and Citrix will discuss these findings in a 30-minute webinar Thursday, February 27th at 2 p.m. EST. Register HERE.

Media Contact: Pam Kassner, pam@superpear.com, 414-510-1838

Why the Federal Government’s Telework “Policy” Won’t Achieve Flexible Work Success

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I was originally booked on Federal News Radio’s “Federal Drive” morning show to discuss how TWEAK IT can help individuals can find a better work-life “balance.”

But, the segment quickly turned into an opportunity to reinforce the link between work flexibility AND the skills and tools people need to capture that flexibility and use it to be their best, on and off the job (which, ultimately, is what TWEAK IT is about).

Below, you will find a link to the lively 13-minute discussion I had with hosts, Tom Temin and Emily Kopp.  Some of the key points we covered included:

  • Like in any organization, the government’s telework “policy” is not enough to create a successful culture of flexibility that meets the needs of the organization and its people.
  • In an environment with more duties and fewer resources, we can’t keep working harder and faster. We have to work and manage our lives smarter and better.
  • Telework is not a “program,” it is a way of operating in this “do more with less” environment that requires a partnership between the workplace and the person using it.
  • The skill set individuals need to play their role in that flexible work partnership includes the ongoing small, meaningful  ”tweaks” to manage their everyday work+life fit and the “resets” that involve a more formal flexible work plan.
  • Truth is that not every type of job or level supports the same type of work flexibility. Good news is the everyday work+life “fit” how-to in TWEAK IT applies to everyone, regardless of the flexibility your job supports.
  • Technology allows more flexibility, but it has also caused us to become more reactive. We need to set better boundaries throughout the day but don’t know how.
  • We have to learn how to test expectations. Sometimes we think we have to respond immediately when we get a late night email or when we are on vacation.  But that is not the case.  Yet we don’t ask.

And there is much, much more.  Let me know what you think in the comments section.

And, if you haven’t already, I would love to connect with you on Twitter @caliyost and on Facebook and continue the conversation.

Students Challenge Singapore to “TWEAK IT” with Contest and Clever Video

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Here’s an experience to file under “You never know the impact of your words.”

This week I’ve shared highlights from my recent trip to Singapore (here and here), but nothing prepared me for this fun surprise!

A few weeks ago, I received an email from a group of students in Singapore who attend Wee Kim Wee School of Communications and Information at Nanyang Technological University.

They were inspired by my “Tweak It” message , and wanted to encourage people to capture the power of small, deliberate actions to find a better “fit” between their work and the other parts of life.

They asked if they could launch a “Tweak It” Singapore awareness campaign.  I said, “Go for it!”

Check out the smart, clever short animated video they created “5 Things Work Life Balance is NOT.” I love it!

Go TWEAK IT (sg)!